D Castro Speaks On Being A Videographer & A Body Painter To The Stars

D Castro is a videographer, photographer, and body painter originally from Virginia. He has worked with the likes of Kash Doll, OJ Da Juiceman, Zaytoven, Rocko, LightSkinKeisha, and many others. In a recent interview on The Progress Report, D Castro speaks on his experience, being professional in sexual environments, respect for the OGs, and building his network.

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How the Yakuza Made Tattoo Culture Illegal in Japan | Under the Ink

Tebori describes the hand-carven technique of Japanese tattooing. It’s a traditional method that dates back to the 17th century, but was once completely banned after being closely associated with the yakuza, Japan’s organized crime syndicates.

Tattooing overall in Japan is taboo. The government itself deems that one must be a licensed health professional to tattoo, but the government isn’t issuing licenses to tattoo, leaving the profession in a legal grey zone.

In the first episode of Under the Ink, we follow Horimasa Tosui, who tattoos in secret in order to practice his work.

See some of Horimasa’s work on his Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/horimasa_tosui

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How the Yakuza Changed Tattoo Culture in Japan | Under the Ink

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America’s Biggest Japanese Tattoo Artists: Taki and Horitomo | Tattoo Age Episode 3

Taki and Horitomo are the dynamic duo of Japanese style tattooing in the United States. In addition to tattooing, they also document the art form through museum shows and books.

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The Definitive Guide To Enlightening Information. From every corner of the planet, our immersive, caustic, ground-breaking and often bizarre stories have changed the way people think about culture, crime, art, parties, fashion, protest, the internet and other subjects that don’t even have names yet. Browse the growing library and discover corners of the world you never knew existed. Welcome to VICE.

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The Brutal Tattoo Ritual Built on Pain

Tattoos hurt, but for most people, the pain is just a means to an end. Tattoo artists are usually mindful of their client’s pain threshold, catering for breaks and mitigating any unnecessary brutality. It’s abnormal for tattoo artists to restrain people while they’re getting tattooed, or for the tattooee to bolt upright in agony to escape the needle’s unrelenting penetrations. Nor is it very common to see sadistic mirth occupying the faces of multiple tattoo artists as they inflict the unnaturally long, thick, shallow lines seemingly without pause.

Enter Brutal Black. It’s the tattoo project where mandalas come to die and where pain is prioritized over aesthetics. Ritual and rebirth are at the forefront of this project helmed by Valerio Cancellier and Cammy Stewart. They take those brave enough to be tattooed by them on one of the most brutal experiences one can imagine; far beyond one’s threshold for pain to create an entirely new experience.

CORRECTION: This text was adapted from a VICE article on Brutal Black by Fareed Kaviani: https://vice.video/2iHZF5r. Due to an oversight, he was not properly credited in an earlier version of this synopsis. We regret the error.

WATCH NEXT: Hong Kong Tattoo Legend: VICE INTL https://vice.video/2zV9C9p

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The Japanese Tattoo Duo: Taki & Horitomo – TATTOO AGE (Full Episode)

Taki and Horitomo are the dynamic duo of Japanese style tattooing in the United States. In addition to tattooing, they also document the art form through museum shows and books.

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Nicole ‘Snooki’ Polizzi and Nico Tortorella’s New MTV Tattoo Show Is a ‘Psychological Think Tank’

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 Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi and Nico Tortorella are the dynamic duo we never knew we needed.  The Jersey Shore star and the Younger actor (who actually plays a tattoo artist on the TV Land show) have teamed up to host a new MTV series, How Far Is Tattoo Far?, in which pairs of friends, family members and couples are tasked with designing tattoos for each another. The twist? They can’t see it until it’s permanently inked on their body.  And for Tortorella and Polizzi, both 30 and heavily tatted themselves, it was match made in TV heaven.  “The second Nicole and I were in a room together, it was just this instant bond,” Tortorella tells PEOPLE. “We feel like we’ve known each other for a lifetime. Our souls match.”  “We’re very emotional,” Polizzi adds. “We cry a lot at the reveals. And we scream. We’re very dramatic.”  With the help of some of the most creative and talented tattoo artists in the industry, the series will follow the blindfolded duos as they learn the stories behind the designs that are now on their bodies. The process is “highly stressful,” the hosts say.  “We’re both intense empaths,” Tortorella says. “We feel everything that these people are going through each episode. It’s almost like we’re getting the tattoos, too.”  Tortorella says the show has essentially become a “psychological think tank.”  “The psychology behind this is really what keeps me the most invested,” he says. “Because you have these people come in, and whether they’re lovers, family members or best friends, they know each other really, really deeply.”  “And then they f— with each other,” Polizzi explains.  “Well, some of them,” Tortorella says. “Not everybody has f—ed with each other. We have some really positive, emotional pieces as well. But that being said, even the stuff that’s ‘negative’ or jokey, in a sense, there is still some sort of therapeutic medicine in the tattoos, which is just fascinating. Let’s just say people don’t have much of a filter when it comes to imagery. They’re really going for it.”  “Seeing these people go on these journeys within the hours that we have them, they go through every single emotion possible,” he marvels. “From so excited when they get here to complete emotional breakdowns and everything in between.”  The show is based on the hit international format, Just Tattoo of Us — but according to Polizzi and Tortorella, the U.S. version will be quite different.  “The first thing that I said when I agreed to do this was, given our socio-political landscape here in the United States, I don’t want to go on this show and just start degrading women,” Tortorella says. “I don’t want to throw ‘slut’ on someone’s a—, like they did in London. We can’t do that here right now — we just can’t.”  “Luckily it hasn’t gone down that road,” Polizzi says.  “This show is so much more than that,” Tortorella says. “We’re really not trying to divide people, we’re not trying to break people up.”  “And we always make sure everyone

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